Thursday, November 30, 2006

Mira Nair's Monsoon Wedding


Mira Nair's Monsoon Wedding released in 2001 brought the film makers magical touch to bear on the the chaotic beauty of the events, the human drama, the scandal and the intrigue that surrounded a large Punjabi wedding in a modern New Dehli.

The film left an indelible mark on viewers across the globe being honored with the top prize at the Venice Film Festival.Not without justification: It was without question the best film made that year and on par at least with any film made in the past.

Few films can make the familiar seem so arresting, make you re-examine your surroundings with a fresh eye and learn to see the world anew the way Nair did in this film.

Filmed in the cinema verite style that grew out of the French New Wave movement it brought a paced documentary styled delivery and yet managed to imbue each scene with heart and emotion.

If art captures life at its most pivotal moments then Nair did so effortlessy in scene after scene.

In this scene, the colors and shading of twillight in Dehli fill the palate and underscore the casual glances shared between Alice and Dubey



This next scene is a rich tapestry of tradition, but free from any academic mediation. The scene is organic as each role played is engaged in the scene, with no background parts to speak of.




The disturbing nature of this scene is brought into relief by the innocuous setting. The sense of divided loyalties at first preventing action on a real crime is palapable. The rising level of tension is clearly seen and done in such a believable way as to allign with how it would have been realistically handled.






Nair gave scope to the possiblity that exists in the future of Indian film adding to an already rich and wondrous tradition.

2 comments:

Beth said...

This was the first Indian movie I ever saw and I fell in love with it completely. It remains a favorite - from any place, time, or genre.

Thanks for the link! I look forward to reading your posts.

Gagan said...

Thanks Beth. I aggree. I saw it in India along with college mates in a crowded sweaty theatre and it was transforming....:)